What makes the world go round?

My answer: gravity

Other people would say money.

So as you may be aware, Brent and I have a plan to live debt-free.  This plan is TOUGH especially with things like a WEDDING (which has unexpected expenses popping up), Thanksgiving at our house, Christmas and Renewal of Insurance coming up. YIKES.

Our biggest success so far (in the 2 weeks we’ve been living on a budget) is in the grocery department.  We have allotted ourselves $40/week for all food.  First we thought it would be difficult but it really isn’t.  We’ve come in under budget both weeks and have been eating just as well as before.  The trick is to plan your meals ahead of time.  Our method is to plan dinners for the whole week and pick up those items at the store first (bring a calculator!).  Each meal I make usually has enough leftovers for the next day’s lunch for the two of us so that alone makes 2 meals a day.  Then with whatever money is left over, we pick up things like fruit and oatmeal etc for breakfasts and snacks.

We keep the left over money from each week (oh yeah, we really only bring the allotted $40 in cash to the store so we don’t try and go over) in an envelope to use for special holiday meals that are likely to cost us a little over our budget.

Becuase of this, we have also stopped going out to dinner at restaurants unless somebody want’s to pony up their personal spending money for it (we have alotted ourselves each $10 a week so that’s not bloody likely)

After bills and mortgage, EVERYTHING goes to paying off the highest interest credit card (although minimum payments are still being made on the others) so that it get’s paid quickly.  Then we systematically pay them all off. Obviously this means that we are not supposed to use them in this time, which might be difficult for example, for Brent who needs to take random business trips and pay for them untill he gets a reimbursement from his work about a month later.

Assuming we don’t get raises, tax returns or cash wedding gifts, this will take us approximately 2 years to accomplish (not really counting the line of credit OH MY).  In my experience, things always work out somehow and money I wasn’t expecting shows up to save the day.

I’m estimating that collectively, not including the mortgage, we are about $20 000 in dept (including the line of credit).  Anyways, I’m generally number-phobic but to me this seems pretty manageable as long as we stick with it.

Do you have any money-saving / debt-reducing tips?

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63 Comments on “What makes the world go round?”

  1. superfrayed says:

    I’m seriously amazed that you can keep your weekly groceries so low.
    Ours are always around the $120 mark and that’s not buying any extras.
    The only thing I can think of that we’ve done is throw the credit card balance on the credit line, or get a consolidation loan and that way you get much lower interest than the credit cards? Or simply call up the cc company and ask for a lower interest rate, if you regularly pay your min pmt on time, they’ll lower it.

    • tianadargent says:

      We’ve put some of our credit dept on the line of credit but we try to keep some space open for big emergencies (like Oh…a flat tire or something) as we don’t have a HUGE line of credit.
      If you want, starting next week I can post the meal plans and groceries if you think it will help you out. I find a lot of savings come from making your own bread/pasta/stock, getting basics in bulk and not over-buying. We used to throw out about 1/4 of our produce at the end of the week because we thought we’d eat it but we didn’t.

    • tianadargent says:

      We’ve put some of our credit dept on the line of credit but we try to keep some space open for big emergencies (like Oh…a flat tire or something) as we don’t have a HUGE line of credit.
      If you want, starting next week I can post the meal plans and groceries if you think it will help you out. I find a lot of savings come from making your own bread/pasta/stock, getting basics in bulk and not over-buying. We used to throw out about 1/4 of our produce at the end of the week because we thought we’d eat it but we didn’t.

    • tianadargent says:

      We’ve put some of our credit dept on the line of credit but we try to keep some space open for big emergencies (like Oh…a flat tire or something) as we don’t have a HUGE line of credit.
      If you want, starting next week I can post the meal plans and groceries if you think it will help you out. I find a lot of savings come from making your own bread/pasta/stock, getting basics in bulk and not over-buying. We used to throw out about 1/4 of our produce at the end of the week because we thought we’d eat it but we didn’t.

  2. superfrayed says:

    I’m seriously amazed that you can keep your weekly groceries so low.
    Ours are always around the $120 mark and that’s not buying any extras.
    The only thing I can think of that we’ve done is throw the credit card balance on the credit line, or get a consolidation loan and that way you get much lower interest than the credit cards? Or simply call up the cc company and ask for a lower interest rate, if you regularly pay your min pmt on time, they’ll lower it.

  3. superfrayed says:

    I’m seriously amazed that you can keep your weekly groceries so low.
    Ours are always around the $120 mark and that’s not buying any extras.
    The only thing I can think of that we’ve done is throw the credit card balance on the credit line, or get a consolidation loan and that way you get much lower interest than the credit cards? Or simply call up the cc company and ask for a lower interest rate, if you regularly pay your min pmt on time, they’ll lower it.

  4. sassinate says:

    Good for you sticking to a budget!! When we sat down to figure out how much we wre buying on groceries we were shocked! How we alot $100/pay period (which is every two weeks). Which is fine. Saves room for Brett’s ‘nibblies’. He gets grumpy when he doesn’t have nibblies, and since I insist that he can’t buy the regular old fried chips we end up spending $5-6 dollars for the healthier baked ones.

    • tianadargent says:

      Oh and making your own chips is EASY!
      You can use a potato peeler r a mandolin slicer to slice the potatos, lightly coat some baking sheets with olive oil and sprinkle the postatos with whatever you like.
      Bake at a low temperature until crispy, turning them every now and then. If you have a rack, you don’t need to turn them.
      Favorite toppings:fresh parmesan, rosemary, black pepper.

    • tianadargent says:

      Oh and making your own chips is EASY!
      You can use a potato peeler r a mandolin slicer to slice the potatos, lightly coat some baking sheets with olive oil and sprinkle the postatos with whatever you like.
      Bake at a low temperature until crispy, turning them every now and then. If you have a rack, you don’t need to turn them.
      Favorite toppings:fresh parmesan, rosemary, black pepper.

    • tianadargent says:

      Oh and making your own chips is EASY!
      You can use a potato peeler r a mandolin slicer to slice the potatos, lightly coat some baking sheets with olive oil and sprinkle the postatos with whatever you like.
      Bake at a low temperature until crispy, turning them every now and then. If you have a rack, you don’t need to turn them.
      Favorite toppings:fresh parmesan, rosemary, black pepper.

  5. sassinate says:

    Good for you sticking to a budget!! When we sat down to figure out how much we wre buying on groceries we were shocked! How we alot $100/pay period (which is every two weeks). Which is fine. Saves room for Brett’s ‘nibblies’. He gets grumpy when he doesn’t have nibblies, and since I insist that he can’t buy the regular old fried chips we end up spending $5-6 dollars for the healthier baked ones.

  6. sassinate says:

    Good for you sticking to a budget!! When we sat down to figure out how much we wre buying on groceries we were shocked! How we alot $100/pay period (which is every two weeks). Which is fine. Saves room for Brett’s ‘nibblies’. He gets grumpy when he doesn’t have nibblies, and since I insist that he can’t buy the regular old fried chips we end up spending $5-6 dollars for the healthier baked ones.

  7. sassinate says:

    oh, and I forgot to write my money-saving tips. Grocery store flyers. Stock up on things when they are on special. Okay, so your grocery bill might be $60 dollars one week, but it will be only $20 the next. When rice, meat, TP etc. go on special splurge and buy things for the cheaper price.
    ALSO I don’t know if you have a farmers market around you but right now veggies are super cheap. I just bought two bushels of peppers (one red, one green) took hours to cut them up and shoved them into zippie bags for the freezer. Total cost $30 for over 100 peppers. Since we eat about 3 peppers a week (and thats if I don’ t make chilli or spaghettis sauce which I love to add peppers too) it will save us LOTS of money come january when each pepper can be upwards of $1.50!! That would be almost $18/month in the winter! Just to satisfy my love of peppers.
    Anyway, its so much easier to stay on budget in the summer when the veggies are super cheap, so take advantage of that now, stock up and save in the winter. If you like squashes they keep well, also super cheap at farmers markets.

    • tianadargent says:

      Thanks for the tip! I’ve actually been doing this a little but the market is a bit tricky since it’s downtown and taking the bus with produce at rush hour=not fun.
      I find that sometimes, I don’t need to use an entire zuccini for my meal for exaple so I freeze half and then can use it whenever I want, or if I buy something and realize it will go bad before I use it, I freeze them (I did this with half of a giant tub of spinach I bought on sale a while back) in single portions.

    • tianadargent says:

      Thanks for the tip! I’ve actually been doing this a little but the market is a bit tricky since it’s downtown and taking the bus with produce at rush hour=not fun.
      I find that sometimes, I don’t need to use an entire zuccini for my meal for exaple so I freeze half and then can use it whenever I want, or if I buy something and realize it will go bad before I use it, I freeze them (I did this with half of a giant tub of spinach I bought on sale a while back) in single portions.

    • tianadargent says:

      Thanks for the tip! I’ve actually been doing this a little but the market is a bit tricky since it’s downtown and taking the bus with produce at rush hour=not fun.
      I find that sometimes, I don’t need to use an entire zuccini for my meal for exaple so I freeze half and then can use it whenever I want, or if I buy something and realize it will go bad before I use it, I freeze them (I did this with half of a giant tub of spinach I bought on sale a while back) in single portions.

  8. sassinate says:

    oh, and I forgot to write my money-saving tips. Grocery store flyers. Stock up on things when they are on special. Okay, so your grocery bill might be $60 dollars one week, but it will be only $20 the next. When rice, meat, TP etc. go on special splurge and buy things for the cheaper price.
    ALSO I don’t know if you have a farmers market around you but right now veggies are super cheap. I just bought two bushels of peppers (one red, one green) took hours to cut them up and shoved them into zippie bags for the freezer. Total cost $30 for over 100 peppers. Since we eat about 3 peppers a week (and thats if I don’ t make chilli or spaghettis sauce which I love to add peppers too) it will save us LOTS of money come january when each pepper can be upwards of $1.50!! That would be almost $18/month in the winter! Just to satisfy my love of peppers.
    Anyway, its so much easier to stay on budget in the summer when the veggies are super cheap, so take advantage of that now, stock up and save in the winter. If you like squashes they keep well, also super cheap at farmers markets.

  9. sassinate says:

    oh, and I forgot to write my money-saving tips. Grocery store flyers. Stock up on things when they are on special. Okay, so your grocery bill might be $60 dollars one week, but it will be only $20 the next. When rice, meat, TP etc. go on special splurge and buy things for the cheaper price.
    ALSO I don’t know if you have a farmers market around you but right now veggies are super cheap. I just bought two bushels of peppers (one red, one green) took hours to cut them up and shoved them into zippie bags for the freezer. Total cost $30 for over 100 peppers. Since we eat about 3 peppers a week (and thats if I don’ t make chilli or spaghettis sauce which I love to add peppers too) it will save us LOTS of money come january when each pepper can be upwards of $1.50!! That would be almost $18/month in the winter! Just to satisfy my love of peppers.
    Anyway, its so much easier to stay on budget in the summer when the veggies are super cheap, so take advantage of that now, stock up and save in the winter. If you like squashes they keep well, also super cheap at farmers markets.

  10. c9 says:

    We buy most of our food at the local farmer’s market, which saves money as long as you buy what’s locally in season. It’s a rip-off if you buy your tropical fruit and berries though. 🙂
    It sounds like you two have a very good handle on future spending, and you know where your weak points are, so you’re already way ahead of about 95% of the continent. Good work!
    For existing debt, one thing you can consider is the interest charges on your cards each month. Those can really add up, obviously. What we do when we need to carry a debt is we put it on something with lower interest. Usually this is our line of credit, but regularly our credit card companies send us balance transfer cheques which include a low interest rate for a certain period of time. For example, my CIBC Visa often has 4.9% for six months on any amount transferred. The down side is that the rate goes back to full once that time runs out, or sooner if you miss a payment.
    My PC Mastercard is awesome – they offer 4.97% right now on any amount transferred for as long as it takes to pay it off! That’s better than our line of credit, so I only use my PC MC for holding a low-interest balance, I never actually buy things with it.
    Doing this requires some diligence of course. If you miss payments, or mix up cards, you can cause big interest charges, so only do it if you are careful about that stuff.

    • tianadargent says:

      Yeah we were considering that but I’m not really that diligent about this stuff. The only cards with igh interest are mine (wo of them) and they both have low enough balances that they will be paid off pretty shortly so interest isn’t the biggest issue for us.

      • c9 says:

        One other option is just calling Credit Card Company A and asking them to transfer the balance from Credit Card B, if they have balance transfer specials. Then it doesn’t require any special diligence because the total will just stay on the card until you can pay it off, but you might be able to save a bit.

        • tianadargent says:

          I will check into that!

          • c9 says:

            Their number-one goal is increasing the amount of debt you hold with their company as opposed to other companies. Every special, every points program, every commercial for a credit card is dedicated to that end. The person you’re talking to might even get a bonus if they get enough credit on their books. So hopefully they’ll do something for you!

          • c9 says:

            Their number-one goal is increasing the amount of debt you hold with their company as opposed to other companies. Every special, every points program, every commercial for a credit card is dedicated to that end. The person you’re talking to might even get a bonus if they get enough credit on their books. So hopefully they’ll do something for you!

          • c9 says:

            Their number-one goal is increasing the amount of debt you hold with their company as opposed to other companies. Every special, every points program, every commercial for a credit card is dedicated to that end. The person you’re talking to might even get a bonus if they get enough credit on their books. So hopefully they’ll do something for you!

        • tianadargent says:

          I will check into that!

        • tianadargent says:

          I will check into that!

      • c9 says:

        One other option is just calling Credit Card Company A and asking them to transfer the balance from Credit Card B, if they have balance transfer specials. Then it doesn’t require any special diligence because the total will just stay on the card until you can pay it off, but you might be able to save a bit.

      • c9 says:

        One other option is just calling Credit Card Company A and asking them to transfer the balance from Credit Card B, if they have balance transfer specials. Then it doesn’t require any special diligence because the total will just stay on the card until you can pay it off, but you might be able to save a bit.

    • tianadargent says:

      Yeah we were considering that but I’m not really that diligent about this stuff. The only cards with igh interest are mine (wo of them) and they both have low enough balances that they will be paid off pretty shortly so interest isn’t the biggest issue for us.

    • tianadargent says:

      Yeah we were considering that but I’m not really that diligent about this stuff. The only cards with igh interest are mine (wo of them) and they both have low enough balances that they will be paid off pretty shortly so interest isn’t the biggest issue for us.

  11. c9 says:

    We buy most of our food at the local farmer’s market, which saves money as long as you buy what’s locally in season. It’s a rip-off if you buy your tropical fruit and berries though. 🙂
    It sounds like you two have a very good handle on future spending, and you know where your weak points are, so you’re already way ahead of about 95% of the continent. Good work!
    For existing debt, one thing you can consider is the interest charges on your cards each month. Those can really add up, obviously. What we do when we need to carry a debt is we put it on something with lower interest. Usually this is our line of credit, but regularly our credit card companies send us balance transfer cheques which include a low interest rate for a certain period of time. For example, my CIBC Visa often has 4.9% for six months on any amount transferred. The down side is that the rate goes back to full once that time runs out, or sooner if you miss a payment.
    My PC Mastercard is awesome – they offer 4.97% right now on any amount transferred for as long as it takes to pay it off! That’s better than our line of credit, so I only use my PC MC for holding a low-interest balance, I never actually buy things with it.
    Doing this requires some diligence of course. If you miss payments, or mix up cards, you can cause big interest charges, so only do it if you are careful about that stuff.

  12. c9 says:

    We buy most of our food at the local farmer’s market, which saves money as long as you buy what’s locally in season. It’s a rip-off if you buy your tropical fruit and berries though. 🙂
    It sounds like you two have a very good handle on future spending, and you know where your weak points are, so you’re already way ahead of about 95% of the continent. Good work!
    For existing debt, one thing you can consider is the interest charges on your cards each month. Those can really add up, obviously. What we do when we need to carry a debt is we put it on something with lower interest. Usually this is our line of credit, but regularly our credit card companies send us balance transfer cheques which include a low interest rate for a certain period of time. For example, my CIBC Visa often has 4.9% for six months on any amount transferred. The down side is that the rate goes back to full once that time runs out, or sooner if you miss a payment.
    My PC Mastercard is awesome – they offer 4.97% right now on any amount transferred for as long as it takes to pay it off! That’s better than our line of credit, so I only use my PC MC for holding a low-interest balance, I never actually buy things with it.
    Doing this requires some diligence of course. If you miss payments, or mix up cards, you can cause big interest charges, so only do it if you are careful about that stuff.

  13. gawd. debt and me go hand in hand. i’m probably pushing as much debt as you without owning a home or getting married. 😛 working 2 jobs helps but i wouldn’t recommend that to anyone. hahahah
    things that i find help are leaving my wallet at home, making sure that i have have an alotted shopping day which is the only day that i’m allowed to do any food shopping, i ride my bike or walk everywhere i can so that i’m not spending money on bus tickets, i try to buy in bulk so that i’m not paying for a brand or a package (vancouver is one of the most expensive places in the planet what i could get for $20 in groceries in toronto i would likely be pushing over $40 in vancouver).
    yeah, i guess it is a change in lifestyle. i’m obviously not very good at it. i’m on a two year plan as well. *sigh*

  14. gawd. debt and me go hand in hand. i’m probably pushing as much debt as you without owning a home or getting married. 😛 working 2 jobs helps but i wouldn’t recommend that to anyone. hahahah
    things that i find help are leaving my wallet at home, making sure that i have have an alotted shopping day which is the only day that i’m allowed to do any food shopping, i ride my bike or walk everywhere i can so that i’m not spending money on bus tickets, i try to buy in bulk so that i’m not paying for a brand or a package (vancouver is one of the most expensive places in the planet what i could get for $20 in groceries in toronto i would likely be pushing over $40 in vancouver).
    yeah, i guess it is a change in lifestyle. i’m obviously not very good at it. i’m on a two year plan as well. *sigh*

  15. gawd. debt and me go hand in hand. i’m probably pushing as much debt as you without owning a home or getting married. 😛 working 2 jobs helps but i wouldn’t recommend that to anyone. hahahah
    things that i find help are leaving my wallet at home, making sure that i have have an alotted shopping day which is the only day that i’m allowed to do any food shopping, i ride my bike or walk everywhere i can so that i’m not spending money on bus tickets, i try to buy in bulk so that i’m not paying for a brand or a package (vancouver is one of the most expensive places in the planet what i could get for $20 in groceries in toronto i would likely be pushing over $40 in vancouver).
    yeah, i guess it is a change in lifestyle. i’m obviously not very good at it. i’m on a two year plan as well. *sigh*

  16. oikade says:

    My tip!
    I don’t know if you have already seen, and worked out these sort of things with a financial advisor – but if not, I highly recommend it!
    Since Dima and I will purchase a home soon too, and are saving up for babies – we’ve been running all sorts of finance related errands.
    Today our advisor explained us the “Smith Maneuver” – which I could never hope to properly re-explain – but, is a way of managing a mortgage and investments in such a way as to minimize the mortgage interest, pay it off super fast – and make a nice hunk of money in the process. (He is even going to help us ethically invest.)
    Seems pretty worthwhile! Goodluck. I am still struggling to cut down our own grocery bill.

  17. oikade says:

    My tip!
    I don’t know if you have already seen, and worked out these sort of things with a financial advisor – but if not, I highly recommend it!
    Since Dima and I will purchase a home soon too, and are saving up for babies – we’ve been running all sorts of finance related errands.
    Today our advisor explained us the “Smith Maneuver” – which I could never hope to properly re-explain – but, is a way of managing a mortgage and investments in such a way as to minimize the mortgage interest, pay it off super fast – and make a nice hunk of money in the process. (He is even going to help us ethically invest.)
    Seems pretty worthwhile! Goodluck. I am still struggling to cut down our own grocery bill.

  18. oikade says:

    My tip!
    I don’t know if you have already seen, and worked out these sort of things with a financial advisor – but if not, I highly recommend it!
    Since Dima and I will purchase a home soon too, and are saving up for babies – we’ve been running all sorts of finance related errands.
    Today our advisor explained us the “Smith Maneuver” – which I could never hope to properly re-explain – but, is a way of managing a mortgage and investments in such a way as to minimize the mortgage interest, pay it off super fast – and make a nice hunk of money in the process. (He is even going to help us ethically invest.)
    Seems pretty worthwhile! Goodluck. I am still struggling to cut down our own grocery bill.

  19. gringogidget says:

    Oh dear!
    I’d love it if you could be so kind as to possibly show me/us a sample of a week’s groceries that you can stay alive on for $40. I think we spend $100 a week and that’s when I curb the spending. I think we spend $40 alone in meat each week.
    My saving money tip (ha ha ha,hahah, me saving money! haha)
    Keep the cards at home.
    (But we never stick to it)
    I’d really like to try your tip on bringing the money with you so you don’t go over.

    • tianadargent says:

      See we barely eat meat. We’ll it at at other people’s houses and out at restaurants but we only buy it if there’s a special and we freeze most and use it a little at a time.
      Next week I’ll post the meal list and the grocery list. I’m already pretty stocked up on basics so I don’t have to spend on that.

      • gringogidget says:

        I really should try it out.

        • berverse says:

          i dont get it either to be honest. we dont really eat meat and we dont eat any processed or packaged foods, no gluten, nothing with any sort of sugar whatso ever (so basically fruits, vegetables, whole grains legumes, tofu and etc.) but we spend 600$ a month on groceries easily.
          the only time we buy meat is chicken occasionally (like you simon will eat it if he eats out or at someone else’s place and I just rarely eat it at all).
          I really need to start holding onto my grocery reciepts to see what the costly items are week to week.

          • gringogidget says:

            Now that I think about it, I do half my groceries in the Health food store and the other half in the market beside it. I buy a lot of specialty foods… (Organic spaghetti sauce, organic canned soups, spelt breads, brown rice crackers) I am totally addicted to Natural Foods.

          • gringogidget says:

            Now that I think about it, I do half my groceries in the Health food store and the other half in the market beside it. I buy a lot of specialty foods… (Organic spaghetti sauce, organic canned soups, spelt breads, brown rice crackers) I am totally addicted to Natural Foods.

          • gringogidget says:

            Now that I think about it, I do half my groceries in the Health food store and the other half in the market beside it. I buy a lot of specialty foods… (Organic spaghetti sauce, organic canned soups, spelt breads, brown rice crackers) I am totally addicted to Natural Foods.

        • berverse says:

          i dont get it either to be honest. we dont really eat meat and we dont eat any processed or packaged foods, no gluten, nothing with any sort of sugar whatso ever (so basically fruits, vegetables, whole grains legumes, tofu and etc.) but we spend 600$ a month on groceries easily.
          the only time we buy meat is chicken occasionally (like you simon will eat it if he eats out or at someone else’s place and I just rarely eat it at all).
          I really need to start holding onto my grocery reciepts to see what the costly items are week to week.

        • berverse says:

          i dont get it either to be honest. we dont really eat meat and we dont eat any processed or packaged foods, no gluten, nothing with any sort of sugar whatso ever (so basically fruits, vegetables, whole grains legumes, tofu and etc.) but we spend 600$ a month on groceries easily.
          the only time we buy meat is chicken occasionally (like you simon will eat it if he eats out or at someone else’s place and I just rarely eat it at all).
          I really need to start holding onto my grocery reciepts to see what the costly items are week to week.

      • gringogidget says:

        I really should try it out.

      • gringogidget says:

        I really should try it out.

    • tianadargent says:

      See we barely eat meat. We’ll it at at other people’s houses and out at restaurants but we only buy it if there’s a special and we freeze most and use it a little at a time.
      Next week I’ll post the meal list and the grocery list. I’m already pretty stocked up on basics so I don’t have to spend on that.

    • tianadargent says:

      See we barely eat meat. We’ll it at at other people’s houses and out at restaurants but we only buy it if there’s a special and we freeze most and use it a little at a time.
      Next week I’ll post the meal list and the grocery list. I’m already pretty stocked up on basics so I don’t have to spend on that.

  20. gringogidget says:

    Oh dear!
    I’d love it if you could be so kind as to possibly show me/us a sample of a week’s groceries that you can stay alive on for $40. I think we spend $100 a week and that’s when I curb the spending. I think we spend $40 alone in meat each week.
    My saving money tip (ha ha ha,hahah, me saving money! haha)
    Keep the cards at home.
    (But we never stick to it)
    I’d really like to try your tip on bringing the money with you so you don’t go over.

  21. gringogidget says:

    Oh dear!
    I’d love it if you could be so kind as to possibly show me/us a sample of a week’s groceries that you can stay alive on for $40. I think we spend $100 a week and that’s when I curb the spending. I think we spend $40 alone in meat each week.
    My saving money tip (ha ha ha,hahah, me saving money! haha)
    Keep the cards at home.
    (But we never stick to it)
    I’d really like to try your tip on bringing the money with you so you don’t go over.

  22. utsi says:

    i am around 20K after treacle and dad. frugal. i have several frugal communities and groups and such that i read. to try to get ideas. most aren;t incredible though. sounds like you are on the right path. it’s just dedication and constant work. try thinking of odd things that you can do to bring in extra money to help contribute to the debt. i would say simply get through your wedding first 🙂 you might find that folks give you money as a gift. have you thought about what you want to do with that?

    • tianadargent says:

      We thought about it but we really don’t expect much in the way of cash (if any) if yes, it will just pay stuff off and we’ll be at the end of the debt road a little quicker.

      • utsi says:

        figured you would have thought ahead. just figured i would make sure. another thing i find useful is my freezer. right about now i buy onions in the 20-50 lb bags. spend nights chopping and peeling. toss in ziplox and freeze for the rest of the year. last year i bought a 25 lb box of red peppers and roasted them before freezing. raw peppers don;t freeze the best. i portion out into sizes that i use. it has helped immensely. apples- another thing that gets processed. apple crisp and pies are just toss in the frozen fruit. strawberries and raspberries- buy when cheap in flats, and freeze on sheets before tossing into ziplox. the freezer was being thrown out, so cost nothing (though it likely uses more hydro than a current model) check out craigslist or freecycle if you think it might be a useful thought.

      • utsi says:

        figured you would have thought ahead. just figured i would make sure. another thing i find useful is my freezer. right about now i buy onions in the 20-50 lb bags. spend nights chopping and peeling. toss in ziplox and freeze for the rest of the year. last year i bought a 25 lb box of red peppers and roasted them before freezing. raw peppers don;t freeze the best. i portion out into sizes that i use. it has helped immensely. apples- another thing that gets processed. apple crisp and pies are just toss in the frozen fruit. strawberries and raspberries- buy when cheap in flats, and freeze on sheets before tossing into ziplox. the freezer was being thrown out, so cost nothing (though it likely uses more hydro than a current model) check out craigslist or freecycle if you think it might be a useful thought.

      • utsi says:

        figured you would have thought ahead. just figured i would make sure. another thing i find useful is my freezer. right about now i buy onions in the 20-50 lb bags. spend nights chopping and peeling. toss in ziplox and freeze for the rest of the year. last year i bought a 25 lb box of red peppers and roasted them before freezing. raw peppers don;t freeze the best. i portion out into sizes that i use. it has helped immensely. apples- another thing that gets processed. apple crisp and pies are just toss in the frozen fruit. strawberries and raspberries- buy when cheap in flats, and freeze on sheets before tossing into ziplox. the freezer was being thrown out, so cost nothing (though it likely uses more hydro than a current model) check out craigslist or freecycle if you think it might be a useful thought.

    • tianadargent says:

      We thought about it but we really don’t expect much in the way of cash (if any) if yes, it will just pay stuff off and we’ll be at the end of the debt road a little quicker.

    • tianadargent says:

      We thought about it but we really don’t expect much in the way of cash (if any) if yes, it will just pay stuff off and we’ll be at the end of the debt road a little quicker.

  23. utsi says:

    i am around 20K after treacle and dad. frugal. i have several frugal communities and groups and such that i read. to try to get ideas. most aren;t incredible though. sounds like you are on the right path. it’s just dedication and constant work. try thinking of odd things that you can do to bring in extra money to help contribute to the debt. i would say simply get through your wedding first 🙂 you might find that folks give you money as a gift. have you thought about what you want to do with that?

  24. utsi says:

    i am around 20K after treacle and dad. frugal. i have several frugal communities and groups and such that i read. to try to get ideas. most aren;t incredible though. sounds like you are on the right path. it’s just dedication and constant work. try thinking of odd things that you can do to bring in extra money to help contribute to the debt. i would say simply get through your wedding first 🙂 you might find that folks give you money as a gift. have you thought about what you want to do with that?


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